Human Traffic Watch

Posts Tagged ‘somaly mam’

Somaly Mam: How To End Modern Slavery And Human Trafficking

In Child Sex Trafficking, Forced Prostitution, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on December 3, 2013 at 10:01 am

Editor’s Note: Somaly Mam is a global leader who has pioneered the movement against modern slavery for nearly two decades. She has been recognized as a CNN hero, Glamour Magazine’s Woman of the Year, and one of Time Magazine’s most influential people. Through her work as a tireless advocate and human rights leader, Somaly Mam has made it her life’s mission to eradicate slavery and empower its survivors as part of the solution. This article is part of a series of op-eds from key speakers and delegates participating in this year’s Social Innovation Summit, which takes place on November 19th and 20th at Stanford Business School. View the full series here.

 As a survivor of sex slavery, I have dedicated my life’s work to ending it. To many people, the issue of slavery seems like a clear case of right and wrong. The reality is much more complicated. There are many root causes and serious challenges. But these challenges do not stop me from continuing to find solutions to eradicate slavery and empower its survivors as part of the solution.

A significant number of people believe that slavery ended in 1863, when in fact, modern slavery exists in every corner of the globe. Not just in remote parts of Southeast Asia, but in your hometown, in your backyard.  In America, there are 60,000 men, women, and children enslaved at this very moment.

Source: Forbes

Slavery and Sex Trafficking Discussion with Nicholas Kristof, Somaly Mam and Rachel Lloyd

In Awareness, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on January 21, 2013 at 1:21 pm

[INTERVIEW] SHAY MITCHELL TALKS ABOUT FIGHTING HUMAN TRAFFICKING WITH SOMALY MAM

In Awareness, Child Sex Trafficking, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on January 16, 2013 at 12:39 pm
Photo: (Somaly Mam Foundation)

Photo: (Somaly Mam Foundation)

ACT: Can you tell us about your experience visiting Cambodia and being with Somaly Mam? What inspiring stories of change did you see while visiting?

SHAY: When I went down to Cambodia, it was a lot to take in. You’re seeing these children, children, who haven’t even experienced a childhood before coming into Somaly’s centers. I think every child deserves to have a childhood and be carefree. Hearing some of the stories of what they’ve been through is just horrific.

My friends and I went to the Kampong Cham center, and we literally got out of the truck and the younger girls were running to me and my friends. They hadn’t met us before, they had no idea who we were. They didn’t care. It was just the fact we’d come to visit — that was enough for them to come up and give us a hug. They were saying, “Sister, sister.” That was unconditional love like I’ve never felt in my entire life.

Source: MTV

Anti-trafficking activist Somaly Mam visits Australia

In Awareness, Human Trafficking on November 19, 2012 at 2:51 pm

“I was really overwhelmed and touched, but also angry — 100 emotions went through me about what I read in this book and I just wanted to do something about it,” she says.

Ms Lorenzo channelled her newfound passion and started Project Futures, a not-for-profit organisation based in Sydney.

“We raise awareness and funding to support anti-trafficking projects that we believe are in need of support,” she says.

Money raised by Project Futures goes directly to organisations working with trafficked women and girls: The Somaly Mam foundation in Cambodia, the Salvation Army safe house for trafficked women in Sydney and Child Wise in Melbourne.

Somaly Mam is currently in Australia for a 10-day tour to support Project Futures and help further raise awareness of human trafficking. Click here for a full list of public events.

Source: SBS

“My Virginity, $300”

In Awareness, Child Sex Trafficking, Forced Prostitution, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on April 6, 2012 at 3:29 pm

 

The title of this photo reads: “My Virginity, $300”.

The girl in the photo is named Srey Neth. She was sold (by her mother) to a pimp for $300. At times, she was forced to serve 10-20 men a night (along with another female prostitutes) in a “building” in Phnom Penh. Although she escaped (with the help of police), she was diagnosed with HIV. She survived, thankfully with the aid of anti-retroiviral drugs.

There are a number of short videos, television specials, and feature length documentaries that talk about sex trafficking in Cambodia. What angers me is the fact very young girls (as young as five, six) are sold to these brothels to serve numerous men in a night. Not only are these girls are forced into prostitution, but they are treated inhumanely. It sickens me – and it’s not just a problem in Cambodia.

Thankfully, there are women who come out of these experiences – much stronger and empowered to fight back. Take Srey Neth and Somaly Mam, as examples.

Link to video: http://vimeo.com/4642499

(via lovekanno)

Savior of trafficked women wins POSCO prize

In Child Sex Trafficking, Forced Prostitution, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on March 29, 2012 at 3:54 pm

Somaly Mam smiles after an interview in southern Seoul on Wednesday. (Kirsty Taylor/The Korea Herald)

The first woman Somaly Mam rescued from prostitution has stayed in her heart for years, inspiring her to help others.

“I came back from work and I saw a woman who had been beaten in the street,” the Cambodian refuge founder recalled. “She was very skinny with all the blood coming out. I thought: ‘What are the people doing to her?’ I didn’t think of HIV, AIDS or anything ― I just ran over to her. I took her in my arms. I just looked at her and I knew what she wanted to tell me because it happened to me too.”

Mam, who has been awarded the 2012 POSCO TJ Park Prize for Community Development and Philanthropy for helping women escape sex trafficking knows their plight only too well. She herself was sold into sexual slavery at a very young age.

Source: Korea Herald

Fighting Back, One Brothel Raid at a Time

In Human Trafficking on February 5, 2012 at 5:59 pm

The three unmarked police cars ahead of us pulled up in front of the brothel, and the police and prosecutor ran in. Somaly and I followed and watched as police with assault rifles confiscated cellphones from the brothel manager, a middle-aged woman, and her male partner, so that they couldn’t call for reinforcements.We quickly found five girls and one young woman, three Cambodians and three Vietnamese. The youngest turned out to be a seventh grader trafficked from Vietnam three months earlier, making her about 12 years old.The anti-trafficking police found 10 rooms equipped with beds and full of discarded condoms in the trash; the rooms all locked with padlocks from the outside, presumably to incarcerate girls inside. Several other young girls Somaly had photographed in her earlier visit couldn’t be found, despite a frantic search of all the locked rooms. “They’re probably kept at another house in town, but we don’t know where it is,” Somaly said.Soon the mood turned ugly. The brothel-owning family had strong military connections, and the man was wearing the uniform of a senior military officer. Someone inside the brothel must have called in reinforcements, and seven armed soldiers soon arrived to order the police and prosecutor to release the military officer. The prosecutor responded with courage and integrity. He declared that the military officer would have to be taken to the police station. “If you want to stop me, you can shoot me if you dare,” he told the soldiers.The soldiers backed down, but, in the end, the army officer was not charged. The woman, who had more day-to-day involvement in managing the girls, is expected to be prosecuted, and the brothel presumably will now be out of operation. The girls were placed in a shelter run by Somaly, and they are receiving plenty of love from other girls previously extricated from sexual slavery.

(Nicholas Kristof for New York Times)

Fighting Back, One Brothel Raid at a Time

Somaly Mam and Yogi Cameron speak peace

In Child Sex Trafficking, Forced Prostitution, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking, Social Justice on January 31, 2012 at 11:37 am

(via Youtube)

President of National Association of Attorneys General Accepts Petitions From More Than 720,000 Americans Calling for End to Sex Trafficking of Children & Young People

In Human Trafficking, Social Justice on January 28, 2012 at 12:27 pm

On National Human Trafficking Awareness Day (January 11th), ethical beauty retailer, The Body Shop, alongside campaign partners ECPAT USA and The Somaly Mam Foundation, will hand over petition signatures of more than 720,000 U.S. citizens to the President of the National Association of Attorneys General, AG Rob McKenna. The petition demonstrates widespread public concern on the sex trafficking crisis affecting children and young people here in the U.S. and across the world.

Nearly three-quarters of a million signatures were collected at boutiques of The Body Shop in the U.S and online at http://www.thebodyshop.com over the course of 12 months.

Representatives of The Body Shop USA together with NGO partners ECPAT USA and the Somaly Mam Foundation will gather outside of The Body Shop Pacific Place (600 Pine Street, Seattle, WA 98101) to meet with AG McKenna.

Fighting Back, One Brothel Raid at a Time

In Child Sex Trafficking, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on January 28, 2012 at 2:48 am

The three unmarked police cars ahead of us pulled up in front of the brothel, and the police and prosecutor ran in. Somaly and I followed and watched as police with assault rifles confiscated cellphones from the brothel manager, a middle-aged woman, and her male partner, so that they couldn’t call for reinforcements.

We quickly found five girls and one young woman, three Cambodians and three Vietnamese. The youngest turned out to be a seventh grader trafficked from Vietnam three months earlier, making her about 12 years old.

The anti-trafficking police found 10 rooms equipped with beds and full of discarded condoms in the trash; the rooms all locked with padlocks from the outside, presumably to incarcerate girls inside. Several other young girls Somaly had photographed in her earlier visit couldn’t be found, despite a frantic search of all the locked rooms. “They’re probably kept at another house in town, but we don’t know where it is,” Somaly said.

Soon the mood turned ugly. The brothel-owning family had strong military connections, and the man was wearing the uniform of a senior military officer. Someone inside the brothel must have called in reinforcements, and seven armed soldiers soon arrived to order the police and prosecutor to release the military officer. The prosecutor responded with courage and integrity. He declared that the military officer would have to be taken to the police station. “If you want to stop me, you can shoot me if you dare,” he told the soldiers.

The soldiers backed down, but, in the end, the army officer was not charged. The woman, who had more day-to-day involvement in managing the girls, is expected to be prosecuted, and the brothel presumably will now be out of operation. The girls were placed in a shelter run by Somaly, and they are receiving plenty of love from other girls previously extricated from sexual slavery.

(Nicholas Kristof for New York Times)

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