Human Traffic Watch

Archive for the ‘Forced marriage’ Category

FORCED MARRIAGES = HUMAN TRAFFICKING

In Forced marriage, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on October 3, 2013 at 1:00 pm

I recently read an article in the Metro newspaper about Canadian forced marriages that left me feeling conflicted. On one hand, I was pleased to see that this issue is getting a lot of recent media attention for the human rights abuse that it is. On the other, I am concerned that the media has missed a very important point in not labelling forced marriages for what they are: human trafficking. Human trafficking is defined as the recruitment, transportation, harboring, or holding of persons for the purpose of exploitation. There is usually an added component of control that traffickers have over their victims, including force, sexual assault and threats of violence. Forcing someone to marry another against their will by using threats, force or assault satisfies this criteria. In plain and simple terms, forced marriage is slavery.

Source: Free Them Blog

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Modern-day slavery: an explainer

In Awareness, Child Marriage, Child Soldiers, Child Trafficking, Forced Labor, Forced marriage, Human Trafficking, Organ Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on July 7, 2013 at 9:29 am
A worker carries a bag of charcoal on to a truck in Rondon do Para. Brazil was the last country to withdraw from the transatlantic slave trade. Photograph: Mario Tama/Getty

A worker carries a bag of charcoal on to a truck in Rondon do Para. Brazil was the last country to withdraw from the transatlantic slave trade. Photograph: Mario Tama/Getty

How is slavery defined?

Slavery is prohibited under the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states: “No one shall be held in slavery or servitude: slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.”

Definitions of modern-day slavery are mainly taken from the 1956 UN supplementary convention, which says: “debt bondage, serfdom, forced marriage and the delivery of a child for the exploitation of that child are all slavery-like practices and require criminalisation and abolishment”. The 1930 Forced Labour Convention defines forced labour as “all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily”.

As contemporary systems of slavery have evolved, new definitions, including trafficking and distinguishing child slavery from child labour, have developed.

Some of the forms of slavery are:

Bonded labour: people become bonded labourers after falling into debt and being forced to work for free in an attempt to repay it. Many will never pay off their loans, and debt can be passed down through the generations.

Forced labour: where people are forced to work, usually with no payment, through violence or intimidation. Many find themselves trapped, often in a foreign country with no papers, and unable to leave.

Descent-based slavery: where people are born into slavery because their families belong to a class of “slaves” within a society. The status of “slave” passes from mother to child.

Trafficking: the transport or trade of people from one area to another and into conditions of slavery.

Child slavery: children are in slavery as domestic workers, forced labour – in, for example, the cocoa, cotton and fisheries industries – trafficked for labour and sexual exploitation, and used as child soldiers.

Early and forced marriage: women continue to be married without consent, often while still girls, and forced into sexual and domestic servitude.

Source: The Guardian

Child helpline members educate public about child rights through street play

In Child Labor, Child Marriage, Child Sex Trafficking, Child Trafficking, Forced Labor, Forced marriage, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on May 25, 2013 at 4:06 pm

Children Helpline members on Friday educated Mysoreans about children rights and issues haunting them through street play as part of International Child Helpline Day celebrated on May 17.

They told the public that child marriage, employing child for work and child trafficking all attracts penal action. Children, especially street children and orphans, are at risk and they need your (Public) help.

Through plays, the helpline members conveyed the message that children, who are the future of India, require public support to stop crime against young citizens. Public may call the helpline number (1098/2453022) to save such children from danger.

Teenager exposes India’s ‘one month wives’ sex tourism

In Child Marriage, Child Sex Trafficking, Child Trafficking, Forced marriage, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on April 23, 2013 at 2:38 pm

Campaigners for Muslim women’s rights said while short term ‘contract marriages’ are illegal in India and forbidden in Islam, they are increasing in Hyderabad, in southern India, where wealthy foreigners, local agents and ‘Qazis’ – government-appointed Muslim priests – are exploiting poverty among the city’s Muslim families.

The victim, Nausheen Tobassum, revealed the scale of the problem when she escaped from her home last month after her parents pressurised her to consummate a forced marriage to a middle aged Sudanese man who had paid around £1,200 for her to be his ‘wife’ for four weeks.

She told police she had been taken by her aunt to a hotel where she and three other teenage girls were introduced to a Sudanese oil company executive. The ‘groom’, Usama Ibrahim Mohammed, 44 and married with two children in Khartoum, later arrived at her home where a Qazi performed a wedding ceremony.

According to Inspector Vijay Kumar he had paid 100,000 Rupees (around £1,200) to the girl’s aunt Mumtaz Begum, who in turn paid 70,000 Rupees to her parents, 5,000 Rupees to the Qazi, 5,000 Rupees to an Urdu translator and kept 20,000 Rupees herself. The wedding certificate came with a ‘Talaknama’ which fixed the terms of the divorce at the end of the groom’s holiday.

Source: Telegraph

Bride Kidnapping

In Awareness, Child Marriage, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on April 12, 2013 at 1:35 pm

bride-kidnapping_507e89ad110f2_w587

Gamal Eid: Syrian women’s marriage to Egyptian men is human trafficking

In Forced marriage, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on April 7, 2013 at 3:45 pm
An Egyptian “marriage company” advertising facilitation in marrying “ethical” veled and face-veiled women, both Egyptian and Syrian. Marriage companies are common in Egypt, but the availability of Syrian women is a new trend, following the influx of Syrian refugees to Egypt.(Photo courtesy of The National Council of Women in Egypt has condemned the trend

An Egyptian “marriage company” advertising facilitation in marrying “ethical” veled and face-veiled women, both Egyptian and Syrian. Marriage companies are common in Egypt, but the availability of Syrian women is a new trend, following the influx of Syrian refugees to Egypt.
(Photo courtesy of The National Council of Women in Egypt has condemned the trend

Gamal Eid, director of the Arab Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI), stated that the marriage of Egyptian males to female Syrian refugees in exchange for money is a form of human trafficking.

The National Council for Women (NCW) sent two letters to Minister of Interior Mohamed Ibrahim and Minister of Justice Ahmed Mekki on Thursday requesting the ministries’ intervention in combatting this phenomenon.

Eid stated that such marriages taking place is a political disaster. “It’s disastrous that female refugees fleeing their warring country would meet such treatment in Egypt,” he said.

In a statement released on Thursday, the NCW cited a memorandum sent last week to President Mohamed Morsi by the International Union for Egyptian Women, calling for immediate intervention to stop such marriages.

The union stated that Syrian women are made available for marriage to Egyptian men in exchange for EGP 500 per wife, adding that such marriages are especially abundant in 6th of October City, 10th of Ramadan City, and New Cairo, as well as the Alexandria, Al-Daqahleya and Al-Gharbeya governorates. In one year 12,000 marriages have taken place, the union claimed.

The phenomenon has expanded to Facebook pages offering Syrian women for marriage. One particular page, “Syrian girls for marriage in Egypt”, links the marriage to Islamic religion and describes them as offering a helping hand to struggling girls and widows.

Source: Daily News Egypt

Rape and sham marriages: the fears of Syria’s women refugees

In Child Sex Trafficking, Forced marriage, Forced Prostitution, Human Trafficking on April 1, 2013 at 9:31 am

They see we don’t have money. They want to exploit us. Give me your daughter for 200,000 lira or 100,000 lira. It’s exploitation.Abu Sanad, father

Such reports of women being kidnapped, assaulted or raped abound around the camp. Women say security is non existent. They are too afraid even to go to the toilet at night alone.

“I come with my daughter, she enters and I stand here waiting for her,” says Um Hammad. “There are girls who don’t come to the toilet at night. We stay until the morning, holding it in.”

Source: Channel 4

Escape from North Korea: A Modern Refugee Crisis

In Awareness, Forced Labor, Forced marriage, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on March 31, 2013 at 3:17 pm

The increasing availability of outside media information is also attributed as another major factor in inducing North Koreans to flee North Korea. Mee-Ri Kim, an employee at the South Korean NGO, Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights, states: “More and more North Koreans are exposed to outside information sources [such as South Korean television] that show them there is a better world out there.”

Meanwhile, an interesting trend in the statistics is that women comprise over 65% of the number of North Korean defectors to South Korea.

Kim suspects that because of the wider array of economic opportunities available to women in China, more North Korean women flee North Korea than men. Such opportunities include waitress positions and babysitter jobs.

A Newsweek article from August 2012 however offers a darker explanation. Chinese or Korean-Chinese bride-brokers, or matchmakers, attempt to secure North Korean brides for Chinese men, often through trickery.

According to Newsweek, the Chinese one-baby policy combined with traditional Chinese favoritism for sons has now created “an epic surge in bachelors” in rural China, and hence an exploding demand for brides.

These brokers usually shower North Korean women with promises of lucrative jobs and a better education.

Source: The International

A Village in India: Where a Cow Costs More Than a Woman

In Forced Labor, Forced marriage, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on March 3, 2013 at 3:11 pm

Trafficked_Sisters_from_Kolkata

Shafiq wants to introduce us to trafficked women in Aterna, a village of a few hundred people. He says in Aterna alone there are 32 of so-called Paro women (a derogatory term for foreigners). Given a family size of at least five people, there is hardly a family without a Paro – as a purchased wife, maid and field laborer, often trafficked from poorer parts of India.

The situation these women are in is nothing short of slavery.

We arrive on muddy roads due to the unusual rains in this time of the year. Ten of the Paro await us in a semi-secret location in a hut in the village. They are eager to share their experiences.

They talk of hard labor, of beatings and of constant abuse. “Even the village children talk to us like dogs,” they say.

Source: UN.Gift.Hub

Korean nightclub madam sentenced in immigration case

In Forced marriage, Forced Prostitution, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking on February 26, 2013 at 12:16 pm
MIRROR FILE PHOTOThe Blue Moon, located at 31140 Pacific Highway S., just north of South 312th Street in Federal Way. The nightclub's entrance is an unmarked door at the back of the building.

MIRROR FILE PHOTO
The Blue Moon, located at 31140 Pacific Highway S., just north of South 312th Street in Federal Way. The nightclub’s entrance is an unmarked door at the back of the building.

The madam of a nationwide Korean prostitution ring headquartered in Federal Way was sentenced to prison on charges of immigration fraud.

Auburn resident Miyoung Roberts, 42, operated the Blue Moon nightclub on Pacific Highway South. On Friday, she was sentenced to two years in prison and three years of supervised release, according to U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan’s office.

Between 2009 and 2012, Roberts arranged illegal immigration for more than 24 Korean women who traveled around the United States to work at similar nightclubs. According to the attorney’s office, Roberts had “earned a reputation for being a successful room salon madam.”

Roberts also counseled the women, who served as “bar girls,” on how to avoid detection by immigration authorities. She set up apartments for the women and supervised some of the women’s prostitution activities, according to the attorney’s office.

Roberts had gained U.S. citizenship through a fake marriage, and in an attempt to arrange a fake marriage for someone else, she recruited an undercover agent who was working on the case.

Source: Federal Way Mirror

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